(Edit, Jan 26: I put the earlier photo back up. Editing to add a caption reduced the quality.) I can’t be there in person today for this year’s March for Life in Washington, D.C. But I was there last January. Of all the photos I took then, this one is my absolute favorite. I wish I had thought to get the name of the beautiful young woman holding her sign. I’m glad her parents didn’t follow her doctor’s advice to abort her! Thanks be to God!

Genetic defect, huh?

My thoughts and prayers are with all those brave folks marching in the cold in D.C. today. And with all those facing hardship and struggle in their lives, along with the temptation to abort. May God be with them and open their hearts and minds to choose Life!

More of my photos from last year’s March for Life in Washington D.C.

On January 15th we’ll be marching for life again. This will be my third march in Birmingham. I went to the one in Washington, D.C., last year and loved it. I don’t think I can swing such a big trip this time, maybe next year. Gonna do the one in B’ham, though. The march begins with Mass at the Cathedral of Saint Paul downtown at 9 a.m. Then we’ll gather at Brother Bryan Park on Southside at 10:45 a.m. for more prayer, singing, and to listen to a few speakers before the march proper begins.

marchDC_012210_0456_massive

Read more about the March for Life in Birmingham, Jan 15 2011.
Read more about the March for Life in Washington, D.C, Jan 24 2011.
View some photos I took at last year’s march in D.C.

I moved through the crowds in Washington DC on Friday, January 22 2010. People streamed up and down both sides of the streets on every block as I searched for a parking place and as I trudged toward the park where the rally was already in progress. Pro-life people were everywhere. Notice I do not call us “anti-abortionists” or “anti-abortion activists”. The pro-life movement is not only about abortion and is not merely a negative “against something”; it is rather a positive “for something”. For life. For many different aspects of life. For the life of every human person. This is a serious cause and deserves serious treatment by the press. But here is what I heard as I reached a street corner and waited for the light to change. A man (wearing a nice fancy camera) walked up to a woman (also wearing a nice fancy camera) and said, “Oh, AP is here!” A second passed before I realized he meant the press, but then I turned and saw that they both wore press passes around their necks along with their cameras. They were discussing how they were going to cover the March. Apparently neither one of them cared much for the assignment (I say this because of the rather dismissive way they both laughed while they talked) and they were going to finish it off as fast as they could. She said she was going to take a few shots, then one of a building and call it quits. The Smithsonian was right next to the park where the rally was held, so that may be the building she was talking about. Well, at least I didn’t hear them call us any names. Could have been worse, I suppose.

I just finished editing a bunch of photos of the March that took place earlier today. We had freezing rain and sleet this morning but it slacked off as I was heading to the rally. There were pro-life marchers everywhere I looked. I mean everywhere! I uploaded some photos to my Flickr page. I didn’t even try to lug around my Canon Rebel; these were all taken with a little Canon PowerShot SD780 that I bought right before I made the trip. It’s an okay little camera. The main thing I like about it is its size and weight: it’s small enough to fit in my top jacket pocket and fits in the palm of my little bitty hand. :)

A fraction of the crowd at the March for Life in DC I liked the sign this gentleman was carrying
More photos on my Flickr page in my March for Life 2010 DC set.

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I didn’t have to drive nearly a thousand miles to get to Washington D.C. Nope, I could have driven about 750 miles to get here, but I made an unexpected (and unnecessary) detour when I took I-75 instead of I-40 outside of Knoxville. (Sigh.) But that was a minor problem and one solved by backtracking (and a little fuming and venting). The problem of the trampling of the right to life is not so easily solved. But without this basic and foundational right, no other right is possible or even exists. Without the right to life, you have no rights whatsoever. And if we deny that right to anyone now, we are putting nails in our own coffins in the not-so-distant future. Nails in coffins for ourselves and our children and our parents and our friends. Continue reading