Book of the Month, November 2021 – Part 8

+JMJ+ Welcome to part 8 of our Catholic Book of the Month for October (and continuing this November), Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Table of Contents page. (Beginning with this post I’m going to try to remember not to use quotation marks within a block quote since it’s pretty much a given that a block quote is, after all, a quote. Note also that during November the Catholic Book of the Month series continues on Thursdays and on Mondays we’ll focus on the Holy Souls. 

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Book of the Month, November 2021 – Part 7

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+JMJ+ Welcome to part 7 of our Catholic Book of the Month (corrected link) for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Table of Contents (corrected link) page. As I said in my last post, I decided to continue with Sanctity Through the Rosary during November because I think it is timely and it’s important for all of us to get serious about our faith and our spiritual life, so I’ll feature something specifically about the Holy Souls, a video or podcast or something, on Mondays, and continue with Sanctity Through the Rosary on Thursdays.

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Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 6

+JMJ+ Welcome to part 6 of our Catholic Book of the Month (corrected link) for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Table of Contents (corrected link) page.

Continue reading “Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 6”

Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 5

+JMJ+ Welcome to part 5 of our Catholic Book of the Month (corrected link) for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Table of Contents (corrected link) page.

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Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 4

+JMJ+

Welcome to part 4 of our Catholic Book of the Month (corrected link) for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Book of the Month Table of Contents (corrected link) page.

Continue reading “Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 4”

Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 3

+JMJ+ Welcome to part 3 of our Catholic Book of the Month for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Book of the Month Table of Contents (corrected link) page.

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Book of the Month, October 2021 – Part 2

+JMJ+

Welcome to part 2 of our Catholic Book of the Month for October, Sanctity Through the Rosary, by Fr. Édouard Hugon, OP. You can get a printed copy or a PDF using the links at the end of this post and view other parts of the series on the Book of the Month Table of Contents page.

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A Special Post for a Special Feast Day

Updated, October 23, 2020 to add a line with a link to an earlier post and a video, which I included in the endnotes but somehow left out of the paragraph in which they belonged, cuz I’m talented that way.

+JMJ+ The weekly series on the soul, Part 42, will be posted next Thursday because today is a special day for me here at the blog and it snuck up on me and I didn’t realize it fell on a Thursday. Yes, I have a liturgical calendar but, sadly, it won’t slap me in the face and/or write my posts for me. (What, I bought the calendar, now I have to use it, too? Do I have to do everything around here? Oh, well, um, yes, I guess I do. Argh.) So, since October is the month of the Rosary and today is the feast day of Pope St. John Paul II, and the Rosary is so important to me (see, for example, the Rosary Project and the Live Rosary Archives on this site), that’s what I’ll write about tonight. (I’ll write more about why the Rosary is so important to me in another post soon, maybe for Monday’s post, before October is over.)

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On the Rosary

The Vision of St. Dominic, by Bernardo Cavallino, ca. 1640.

May is the month of the Blessed Virgin Mary and this is the third post of May 2020 related to the Blessed Virgin (not a series, just a post). Tonight I’m going to share a few passages from a book about the Rosary that a friend of mine shared on Twitter. (For the life of me I can’t remember if it was Mike or someone else now, sorry! When I find out, I’ll update this note.) The book is The Rosary Guide for Priests and People, by Fr J. Procter, FI, S.T.L., published in 1901. I do ❤️ good, old, Catholic books!

Now I’ve read before about the word “bead” coming from the word bede, meaning to pray. (I do tend to look up the etymology of words, a habit from when I got my first dictionary in the fourth grade, a red Thorndike-Barnhart hardback that I read every day after school. I wonder if it’s still around here somewhere. But I digress.) I knew that way back in the far distant past, people counted prayers by means of pebbles and by things resembling our modern day rosaries. (Or the beads connected by string or metal. The Rosary proper refers to the prayers and meditations, not really the beads.)

But the author mentions some things I didn’t know or at least don’t remember reading before. 

Bede is “the past participle of the Saxon word biddan, which means to pray. We have a relic of it to-day in the Flemish ‘bidden fur uns’ so familiar to the ear of the Saxon in his visits to Belgian churches, and in the German ’bitten’ and ‘bitte.’ A ‘bead’ was originally a prayer. To ‘bid the beads’ was to say one’s prayers. A ‘bede (or bead)-roll’ was a list of those to be prayed for. A ‘bead- house’ was an almshouse for beadsmen, a ‘beads man’ living there on condition of his praying for the soul of the founder. A’ beadsman’ might also be one who voluntarily prayed for another. In the ‘Two Gentlemen of Verona’ Proteus says to Valentine:

"When thou dost meet good hap; and in thy danger,
If ever danger do environ thee, 
Commend thy grievance to my holy prayers,
For I will be thy beadsman, Valentine."
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Why the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary?

Lightly edited on Sept. 20, 2020, for clarity. Thanks for reading!

The famous (or infamous) Mysteries of Light, the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary. Love them? Hate them? Never heard of them? They’re at the center of many heated arguments, both on the web and other places. In this brief post we’ll look at the arguments I’ve personally heard most often for not praying them, and then the argument I find most convincing for praying them. Near the end of this post, the video of an episode of EWTN Live with Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ, with guest Fr. Donald Calloway, MIC, discussing his book, 10 Wonders of the Rosary. (See note 1 below at the end of this post).

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To end the culture of death, pray the Rosary and Chaplet

I’ve been praying the Rosary using the Five Special Intentions given by Pope St. John Paul II, for use with the Divine Mercy chaplet, for several months. Those intentions are aimed at ending abortion and the whole culture of death. I began adding them to the Rosary threads on Twitter (see the Rosary Project on this site) back when the pro-abortion crowd ramped up their demonic efforts to ram barbaric legislation through in a push that has been more aggressive than any we’ve ever seen in this country. (Links at the end of this post.)

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A longish ramble about my longish rambling, the Church, the Rosary, and other things

It’s a bit of a long ramble tonight. Sorry, I didn’t have time to make it shorter. (Hiya, Pascal!) ;)

I don’t know how many of my readers are Catholic and how many aren’t. I assume most are but I wonder. I don’t even know how many actual readers I have. Probably a fraction of those who “follow” me ever get around to reading anything I’ve written. Well, I’m going to do what I’ve been doing, and write as if I’m addressing fellow Catholics or someone who is at least interested in Catholicism. And since this is supposed to be a post about the Blessed Virgin Mary (in the Something About Mary Every Day In May series), tonight I will write about one of my favorite Marian topics: the Rosary. Eventually. ;) Here goes.

When I was a young woman, fresh out of high school and no longer expected to accompany (I used to like that word) my family to church on Sundays, I began to search. I didn’t know what I was searching for, but I knew there had to be something. There had to be some way to know more. More about the reality, truth, the universe, more about how Christianity was supposed to work. No one could ever answer when I asked these things at home or at Sunday School or anywhere else. But I knew that someone somewhere had answers, to my questions, to my deepest longings, and I was determined to find that someone and get my answers, once and for all.

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