The famous (or infamous) Mysteries of Light, the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary. Love them? Hate them? Never heard of them? They’re at the center of many heated arguments, both on the web and other places. In this brief post we’ll look at the arguments I’ve personally heard most often for not praying them, and then the argument I find most convincing for praying them. Near the end of this post, the video of an episode of EWTN Live with Fr. Mitch Pacwa, SJ, with guest Fr. Donald Calloway, MIC, discussing his book, 10 Wonders of the Rosary. At the very end of the post are some links.

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In honor of Father’s Day, coming up on Sunday, I’m watching and sharing a video by Scott Hahn, Understanding the Our Father, from the Coming Home Network’s conference series, Deep in History, based on his book by the same name. (I’ve had this book in my Verbum library for at least a couple of years and I’ve only just now begun to read it. I don’t know how long it was there before I realized it. Correction: I did start reading this a while back but life intervened and I didn’t finish it. Story of my life.) Video below, links at the end of this post.

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Pentecost, by Anthony van Dyck. From Wikimedia, public domain.

I couldn’t stand it. I’ve been eyeing that  book, A Catholic Introduction to the Bible: Old Testament, by John Bergsma and Brant Pitre, and I finally bought the Kindle version. (Yes, I did want the Verbum edition, but I have no idea when that will be out or even if it will be. And patience is not my strong suit.)

One of the first things I did when I started reading this one was run a search for Pentecost. One of the search results, a passage worth quoting at length, was about Pentecost as the undoing of the Tower of Babel. (Links at the end of this post.)

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I once read a review on Amazon in which the reviewer wondered why a certain author suffered from such low self-esteem. I had never heard or read a take like that before about this particular author and it surprised me to see it. But I suppose it shouldn’t have. Humility is little valued by many people, and not only little valued, but not even recognized. And when they see the spiritual quality and virtue of humility they give it—having been too much influenced by worldly pseudo-psychology—the diagnosis of “low self-esteem.” 

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A post in the What is all this stuff? series

When I was either in seventh or eighth grade (could have been freshman year in high school) I picked up the Bible I’d gotten at the Methodist church my family attended, and I read it from cover to cover. It was an RSV. I still have it, though the red dye on the edges of the pages got damp in the trunk of my car (accidentally left it there) and bled onto some of the pages. That was careless and I regret that it happened. I treasured that little book. But did I understand what I read all those years ago? Nope. Not most of it. But I was convinced that someday somehow I would find a way to understand it. 

And one day I did. (Links at the end of this post.)

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Dr. Brant Pitre kicks off my new series, Books I Want Right Now. Dr. Pitre has become one of my favorite Catholic author-speaker-teachers and his new book is due out in August 2019,* Paul, a New Covenant Jew: Rethinking Pauline Theology. (Links at the end of this post.)

Protestants have tended to think of Paul as a proto-Protestant, because he rebuked Peter once, though they tend to ignore the fact that he submitted to Peter before he set out to preach. He allowed himself to be sent, in other words, by the Church which, yes, was already in existence before he was sent to preach and before he began to write probably the earliest of the New Testament writings. And because they misinterpret things he wrote about faith, grace and works. Paul was (and, as he is a saint and alive in Christ, is) Catholic and as far from being a Protestant as it is possible to be.**

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A brief post tonight. June has the potential to be a fruitful month, or perhaps I should say, June looks to be a powerful spiritual-seed-planting month. Today was First Saturday and the Feast of St. Justin Martyr, and the beginning of the novena to the Holy Spirit leading up to Pentecost Sunday on June 9th. (H/T to Msgr. Charles Mangan for pointing that out.) As if that weren’t enough, June is also the month devoted to the Sacred Heart. (There are also links at the end of this post.) [Note: The beginning of the novena was Friday, not Saturday; once again I do not begin a novena on time, sigh.]

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Portuguese School. From Wikimedia, public domain.
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