A post in the What is all this stuff? series

When I was either in seventh or eighth grade (could have been freshman year in high school) I picked up the Bible I’d gotten at the Methodist church my family attended, and I read it from cover to cover. It was an RSV. I still have it, though the red dye on the edges of the pages got damp in the trunk of my car (accidentally left it there) and bled onto some of the pages. That was careless and I regret that it happened. I treasured that little book. But did I understand what I read all those years ago? Nope. Not most of it. But I was convinced that someday somehow I would find a way to understand it. 

And one day I did. (Links at the end of this post.)

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MacSword, Eloquent Bible Study free for MacIn the Resources section’s Bible study links I listed some free software for folks running Windows. I really enjoyed using e-Sword and I’ve been searching a year for something like it for the Mac. Last night I discovered that you can install e-Sword on a Mac…if you install something else first. That something else costs money.

PocketSword, free for iOS devicesBut then I found MacSword, which has been re-named to Eloquent Bible Study (personally, I like the name MacSword better). It’s free, installs easily and there are lots of free modules (Bibles, commentaries, etc) you can download into it (which is easy, easier, in fact, than adding modules to e-Sword used to be when I was using it on my Windows machines before I switched; don’t know if it’s changed). You can also get PocketSword for your iOS device. Adding modules couldn’t be easier. Get it at iTunes.

Have a very Merry ChristMass! Peace be with you!

The St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology has added another free online audio course: Feasts of Faith. Here’s the description from the site:

Feasts of Faith, a free online audio course at the St. Paul Center for Biblical TheologyWhen God became man what became of the feasts of His people, the Israelites? What became of the Passover, Pentecost, the Day of Atonement, the Feast of the Tabernacles, the Lord’s Day, and other special days in the Jewish calendar? Did they lose all significance and meaning after the coming of Christ? Or, like the Old Covenant itself, were they fulfilled in the New?

Join Dr. Scott Hahn and St. Paul Center fellows Dr. Brant Pitre and Dr. Michael Barber, as they tackle those questions and more in Feasts of Faith: The Old Testament Feasts and Their Fulfillment in Christ. Over the course of this study, speakers will trace the evolution and fulfillment of the ancient Jewish Holy Days, exploring the many ways the life and liturgy of the Catholic Church are connected to the life and liturgy of the ancient Israelites. They’ll also help Catholics understand more clearly the Jewish roots of the daily practices of our faith.

Please note that they do ask you to register once at the site, but only once. You can come back and download or listen to or read the material offered as many times as you like. I haven’t listened to this one yet but all the other ones have been excellent and I expect this one is, too.

This morning I was watching television before getting ready to head out for Good Friday services at my parish. I was channel surfing and flipping back and forth between “Bible Battles” on the History Channel and “Beauty and the Beast” on Chiller. The battle that caught my attention was the battle between Moses and Pharaoh in the Exodus (though for some reason I’d never really thought of it as a battle before). Now it so happens that I have the audio of Tim Gray’s excellent study, Adventures in Exodus on my MP3 player and I’ve listened to it many times. So my little ears perked right up when a military historian on that show began speaking about Pharaoh making the Hebrew people into slaves and loading them down with hard labor. And my ears really perked up when he said, to paraphrase,

There’s only one problem; historically speaking, it’s entirely false.

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Welcome to the site where I’ll be blogging my journey into (and within) the Catholic Church. More than a decade has passed now since I was received into Holy Mother Church and I won’t say it’s always been easy. But I will say that it has been powerful, intense, joyful and life-changing. The best thing I ever did was say Yes when I heard that still small voice calling me. I’m still learning to say yes. Things always work out better when I do. Listening, that’s important to learn, too. Of course, I’m still learning about that. Sometimes I don’t listen very well at all. (Everyone around me knows this. I was the last to know.) But enough about me. Let’s talk about the blog. And what I’ll be talking about on the blog. Continue reading