Ascension, by Gregorio Lopez, Portugal. From Wikimedia, public domain.

I took the day off today and didn’t write. Read, thought, prayed the Rosary, and, nope, did not write anything at all. Well, maybe a few notes about things to fix on the blog. Until now. I’m going to share a link to a blog post with you from The Sacred Page, a really excellent site where Brant Pitre, John Bergsma, John Kincaid, and Michael Barber write about the Bible and theology and Catholicism.

Gonna grab some grub in a few minutes and read the rest of the article and then read some other stuff. Got way behind on reading while overhauling the blog (not that I’m finished with that, I’m just finished for a little while) and a whole lotta books are calling my name. Listen. Can ya hear ’em? ;)

Hope your Ascension Sunday (in my neck of the woods, anyway) has been happy and holy. Thanks for visiting and reading. Until next time, whoever and wherever you are, may the Lord bless and keep you and may His peace be always with you. Amen.

Mosaïque d’une des chapelles de la Basilique Notre-Dame du Rosaire (niveau inférieur) : l’Ascension. I think this says, The Ascension Mosaic in the Rosary Chapel in the Basilica of Notre Dame. From Wikimedia, public domain.

We interrupt our reguarly scheduled programming to bring you this important announcement: There are no ascended masters. There is the Ascended Lord, the One Christ Jesus Who ascended into Heaven. He was begotten not made, True God and True Man, One in being with the Father, was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, crucified under Pontius Pilate, suffered, died and was buried. For us men and for our salvation He came down from heaven, and no one—and I mean NO ONE—goes to the Father except through Him. 

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The following is Part 4 in a continuing series which began as a write-up of a talk by Fr. Justin Nolan, FSSP, but instead took on a life of its own and has become some rather broad reflections on salvation history as it leads up to the founding of the Church by Christ, and the Church’s role in salvation. In the next set of posts we’ll go deeper and into more detail.* Come along with me now as we join the disciples of the Lord at this, the darkest time of their lives. Acknowledgments at the end of this post. (Part 1) (Part 2) (Part 3) Continue reading